The challenge

Accidents and emergencies happen every day. Without rapid response by trained people lives are lost when they could have been saved.

This is especially true in poorer countries, where health services are stretched. Road traffic fatalities disproportionately affect low and middle-income countries, where 90% of global road deaths occur. Workplace injuries are increasingly common due to poor safety standards.


The difference between a life lost and a life saved

Deaths and injuries affect economic growth by removing adults from the work force, but also bring families to the edge of survival, when household income suddenly ceases.

The ability of community members to deliver first aid can lessen the impact of an injury and reduce the number of working days that are lost. This can also make the difference between an accident causing catastrophic spending on health needs to something that can be managed within the household budget.


What we do

Charitable first aid training

St John trains community members in first aid, so that more people can give basic and urgent help to people who fall ill and to victims of accidents in traffic, at school, at home or elsewhere in the community. This contributes to the public heath goal of improving community response to medical emergencies.

Private sector first aid

St John International helps St John Associations in poorer countries like Jamaica, Sri Lanka and Zambia to expand their first aid training and services at public events as a social enterprise. An initial investment will help them to develop their first aid and technical capabilities, marketing and sales, as well as back office operations.

St John International is helping the Sri Lanka, Zambia and Jamaica St John Associations to strengthen first aid training to meet the increasing demand in local communities. At the same time, the Associations offer quality first aid training and services to the private sector as a social enterprise.


Our Impact

Through the social enterprise model St John Associations are expanding first aid training, at the same time as building their own organisational resilience.

This will increase the sustainability of St John Associations with new income that can be used for ongoing charitable activities in the community, for example first aid training in church groups, community groups and schools.

We have experience and a proven business model. Now we need to expand our training to support health and safety in workplaces and meet the demands of businesses. This will also serve the public health.

Dr Sarath Samarage, St John Sri Lanka